Fashion, Weekly Words

Weekly Words: 24th June 2017

Daya by Zendaya Collection

Whilst flicking through a magazine earlier this week, I read an interview with Zendaya Coleman, teen-starlet turned fashion designer. In the interview, she mentioned her collection. Naturally, I had to take a look. I went on the website and seen a few pieces that I thought were cute. Of course, it is nothing entirely new (nothing is anymore) but I liked some things nonetheless. I decided to order a velvet blazer that was on sale for $29.99. I placed my order on Monday evening and by Wednesday afternoon I had it in my apartment – super quick delivery. I was amazed to see that the blazer was actually really high quality. The buttons are heavy and feel more like metal than plastic, the fabric is closer to velvet than velour (what you normally get with “velvet” pieces), and the cut is near perfect. Overall I’m really pleased with my purchase & I think I’ll buy more things in the future. I encourage everyone to check the line out!

Two Separate Designers Claim Gucci Stole Their Logos for Its Cruise 2018 Collection – Fashionista

Iv kept this quite for a little while, But its time to speak up and get some attention. Its pretty easy to see that @gucci Has copied not only the combination of elements together that create this logo, but when I overlay my snake illustration on top of the copy, the scales even line up perfectly. Its easy to prove and see whats going on here. Its a shame large corporations "Take" What belongs to us indie artists and use it for their own profit margins. It actually makes me laugh that @lallo25 has so much press wearing this teeshirt around. And the other thing is the tails of the snake don't even connect to anything after they flipped the top half hahaha..! GOLD! #alessandromichele #guccicruise18 #gucci #guccified #copydesign #stuartsmythe #arttheft

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Gucci’s recent collection has been plagued with controversy. First there was the whole Dapper Dan debacle, in which the brand did admit that they had taken inspiration from the Harlem-based designer, and now there are two new artists claiming that Gucci has copied them, and honestly it is clear to see. The first case was from a New Zealand artist who had designed a snake logo for his t-shirt line. All Gucci did in this case was mirror flip the logo and change the text. The second case was from an Australian graphic designer who designed a tiger logo for a tattoo shop (which he owns the rights for). Gucci copied the logo and placement but changed the animal from a tiger to a lion. I think it is very shady that so many elements in this collection have been copied from other artists, all while Alessandro Michele gets the credit and Gucci gets the profits, because we all know that the t-shirts & totes will retail for hundreds of dollars when they cost less than $50 to print…

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Fashion, Weekly Words

Weekly Words: 17th June 2017

In New Condé Nast Partnership, Farfetch Buys — and Shutters — Style.com – Fashionista.com

Thank you @styledotcom & @magdalenafrackowiakjewelry

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The new iteration of Style.com was a short-lived pursuit. Relaunched in September 2016, the Style.com we all knew and loved had disappeared and in its place popped up a curated e-commerce site, like a shoppable magazine edit. Just days ago, model turned jeweler Magdalena Frackowiak posted three screenshots from the website on her Instagram. They had just featured her products along with a mini-review of her line. Come Tuesday and Style.com is gone. Type it in your browser and you will be automatically redirected to FarFetch. It all happened extremely quickly yet it is not entirely surprising. I remember when the original Style.com closed, how disappointing that was given that it used to be the go-to source for all runway shows. Vogue then launched VogueRunway.com which actually just turned into Vogue.com/Fashion-Shows (not a separate site as initially discussed). Then when Style.com relaunched as the e-commerce site, things were a little quiet. It didn’t seem to generate the buzz that Conde Nast had hoped for. It makes sense now that FarFetch have acquired the site. In terms of the online landscape, there really are two major players now and FarFetch are one of them (along with the Yoox Net-a-Porter group). I have written about FarFetch in detail before on my post about the Italian Vogue e-commerce cover because as I said before I think it is the future of fashion. This new acquisition for the company just proves that things are only getting bigger and better. I plan to follow FarFetch’s progress closely.

“Your Favorite Influencers Aren’t Writing Their Own Content – These Women Are” – Marie Claire

An amazing graphic from Marie Claire

Ok let me start this off by saying that this was the first time I’d ever visited Marie Claire’s website and I was so surprised at how beautiful it looked. Really, it’s the most stunning website that I urge you to check out. Secondly, this article was eyeopening to me. First of all, did you know that some influencers do not write any of their content that goes out? That means Instagram captions (even for non-sponsored posts), tweets, anything is all written by a ghostwriter. It seems so crazy to me because people look at influencers as relatable people. We are meant to be getting a glimpse into their real life and their personalities. To find out that there are some out there whose online persona is completely crafted by someone who they haven’t even met (in some cases) is a little bit strange and off-putting to me. Fortunately I am not someone who is heavily swayed by influencers. I don’t buy things because they tell me to. I don’t wear things because they wear them. I don’t think things because they say them. However, some people do, especially younger people. Influencers who are geared towards the teenage set are particularly dangerous in my eyes as the teens will be latching onto something that is entirely fake. It would suck to find out that your idol is, in fact, nothing like how they appear to be online. That used to be the case for celebrities (hence the phrase “never meet your idol”) but for influencers the whole idea was that they were real people. The article goes further into depth about what the ghostwriters do and I encourage you to read it yourself. Transparency is key, people!

“Miami’s best concept store is opening a six floor location in NYC” – CR Fashion Book

The South Beach location

The Webster, South Beach’s luxury concept store perhaps akin to the likes of Maxfield, is opening a new location in SoHo towards the end of the year, and I, for one, am excited to visit. I have heard only good things about the South Beach location, from the selection of designers and merchandise carried (supposedly very cool) to the visuals in-store so I am interested to see how the new store looks. Judging by the write-up in CR Fashion Book plus on various other media outlets, it will be quite the store both architecturally and in terms of visual merchandising. Fashionista.com did an interview with the owner of the boutique, Laure Heriard Dubreuil, and in one of her responses she discussed her merchandising technique of mixing the brands together to curate outfit looks for customers. I love that idea because sometimes it is boring seeing all the brands grouped together and it is easy to bypass cool items because you are not interested in the brand. The store is already generating buzz and an opening date has not even been announced. As far as I can tell, it will be a welcome addition to the SoHo retail landscape.

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Fashion, Weekly Words

Weekly Words: June 10th 2017

“The Kendall Jenner Effect: How Long Can It Last?” – Business of Fashion

officially joining the adidas fam! @adidasoriginals #adidasAmbassador #adidasOriginals

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In a subscribers only article, the BOF team discussed the Kendall Jenner effect, a combination of sales and social media dominance, and how long it will actually last for. The reasoning behind this was the slew of poor publicity which Jenner has been at the forefront of in the past month or so. It was just announced last week that Jenner was the new face of Adidas, the sportswear giant where brother-in-law Kanye West has a hugely successful line. This announcement was met with significant backlash from the press and social media alike with complaints that yet another model (like Gigi & Bella Hadid, for Reebok and Nike respectively) was the face of a sportswear brand instead of using actual athletes. Of course, this was not Jenner’s fault but it seems that she was the straw which broke the camel’s back. The article goes on to compare Jenner to Pierre Cardin, in reference to perhaps diluting her brand or spreading it too thin by taking on so many partnerships – the point being Cardin ruined his brand value and Jenner risks doing the same.

“Yoox Net-a-Porter Group is going completely fur-free” – Fashionista

Looks to try in this cold af weather, Grace Jones for @fendi (1986) | #GlamourGoals #18

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In a surprising move, the Yoox Net-a-Porter group, in an effort to increase sustainability on a major scale, have decided to go completely fur-free, removing all animal fur based products from their outlet site The Outnet. Perhaps I’m finding this move more shocking than it actually is but I don’t understand the mindset behind removing all fur based products from a business standpoint, given that they are a luxury group and fur is the utmost of all luxury products. Even nowadays when people are trending vegan, fur accessories continue to remain popular, even in the form of little pom-pom bag chains. At the end of the article, the writer questions if Farfetch, their largest competitor and the site where NAP founder Natalie Massenet now works, will also go fur-free, citing it as a tempting move to follow. In my mind, this would make Farfetch do the opposite, instead stepping up their fur offering in an attempt to gain all of the sales and customers that Yoox/Net-a-Porter may have lost.

“In Hong Kong to launch second store, Virgil Abloh, Off-White founder and Kanye collaborator, opens up” – South China Morning Post

SS14 Off-White in an editorial for Uname / Unameid.com

The article I’ve linked above was a lengthy discussion with Virgil Abloh about his career and his brand. The most exciting takeaway from the piece was that Abloh’s is getting his own retrospective exhibition of his work in Chicago, at the Museum of Contemporary Art. Due to open in 2019, the exhibition will house pieces from Off-White and the other projects which he has worked on throughout his career. Instead of just looking at the clothing, the exhibition will focus on the broader societal context and millennial culture. The whole idea behind this exhibition sounds really cool and I’d like to go and visit the exhibition when it opens. Virgil’s success over the past 18 months to two years is inspirational. This is a man who has been toiling away for years and finally getting the kudos he deserves.

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Fashion, Weekly Words

Weekly Words: June 3rd 2017

Can a faded fashion house reclaim its 1970s glory? Inside the effort to save Anne Klein – The Washington Post

Robin Givhan’s latest piece delves into the reinvention of the Anne Klein brand and its latest revival. Speaking with the current creative director, Sharon Lombardo, Givhan delivers an interesting and information-heavy profile of the brand and it’s current challenges. Lombardo took the helm of the brand two years ago and has spent her tenure trying to redefine the brand, asking “who is the Anne Klein woman today?”. Lombardo has made many subtle and strategic changes to the brand in an effort to recapture the brand’s former position in the marketplace as the go-to for working women. She has redesigned the logo, began using fit models who are older and larger than the standard, and has changed the materials used in their products (real leather instead of PVC, for one example).

I personally didn’t know a lot about the Anne Klein brand until reading Givhan’s book The Battle of Versailles which tells the story of the lead-up to and the events revolving around the Battle of Versailles, a fundraising fashion show held in 1970s France that was a “battle” between French and American designers. Anne Klein was one of the most commercially successful designers at the time who made sophisticated, wearable sportswear. Soon after the fashion show, Klein succumbed to cancer, leaving Donna Karan, her longtime assistant, as the co-creative leader of her brand. Reading the article about what the brand is doing now to try to recapture their former glory is interesting as the brand has always survived but it has not thrived. They are now taking measures to modernize. I’ll be interested to see how things turn out.

“The Most Influential Stylist of the ’90s on Building a Cult Brand” – The Business of Fashion

Continuing with the brand building theme, Business of Fashion conducted an interview with Melanie Ward who is the stylist responsible for creating some of the most iconic images of Kate Moss back in the 1990s. Ward still works as a stylist now, taking on other responsibilities like creative direction as well. The biggest takeaway from this interview for me was about branding. Ward emphasizes the importance of having your own personal brand but toning it down when working for a client, realizing that you need to suit their brand and speak to their customer when working for them.

The word ‘brand’ is a bit of a buzzword nowadays anyway, with everyone wanting to curate their own brand via Instagram. Something that Ward mentioned was hiring designers based on their following versus their talent, reiterating the (should-be) common sense fact that talent and technical skill is more important than following. I think this theory should apply for all professions, but especially creative jobs in fashion. Overall, I found the interview super interesting, especially the part where Ward lays out her 6 key points of advice for building a brand. I encourage you to read it!

Gucci versus Dapper Dan controversy – various sources

This past week Gucci showed their Resort 2018 collection. Similar to the previous seasons collections, I spotted quite a few pieces going down the runway that I know are either going to sell out in stores, be worn by celebrities, or be the buzziest pieces all over Instagram. It’s impossible not to fall for the Gucci hype nowadays. Even if you don’t care for the clothing, the strength of the shoes and accessories is undeniable.

For the resort season, the collection got slightly more attention on mainstream social media than it normally would, crossing over from the fashion community into the masses. The reason for this being that Alessandro Michele, the creative head of the brand, paraded a jacket down the runway that was a direct copy of a piece Dapper Dan had made in the 1980s for Olympic medalist Diane Dixon. The jacket in question featured puffy, logo-covered sleeves and a fur vest. Dapper Dan’s version has the Louis Vuitton monogram whereas Michele’s has the Gucci pattern. Rightly so, people are calling out for Dapper Dan to get the credit he deserves. Gucci responded, offering slight credit to Dapper Dan but not really acknowledging the issue at hand and only after countless memes were shared and articles published on various outlets.

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Fashion, Weekly Words

Weekly Words: May 27th 2017

“From the archive: Anna Wintour on leaving London for New York” – The Guardian

I don’t know about you but the first thing I do when I wake up is check my email. Among the endless promotional codes and spam-like attempts to capture attention from various retailers lies The Business of Fashion’s Daily Digest. One day last week they highlighted this 1997 article from The Guardian on Anna Wintour, posted on The Guardian’s website as a piece from the archive. I’m not sure why they revived a 20 year old article but it was such a good read. It’s amazing to see how things have changed in that time. As I said when I read the profile of Anna Wintour for the site’s print issue, Anna Wintour comes across really well. She is a formidable woman who earned her place in the industry. She has a reputation for being icy and mean yet every piece of journalism I’ve read relating to her paints a different picture. This profile was endearing because she talks about her own career path in the most humble way possible. She also talks about the differences between the UK and the US, something that I can relate to having made the move myself. If you want to read a good throwback article, click the link above.

“Bella Hadid’s New Nike Campaign Pays Homage To ’70s-era Farrah Fawcett” – Fashionista (IMAGES)

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Fashion, Weekly Words

Weekly Words: May 20th 2017

“A Day in the Life of Kim Kardashian’s Right-Hand Woman, Stephanie Shepherd” – Refinery29

I hate to admit it but recently I’ve found myself watching Keeping Up with the Kardashians on a semi-regular basis. I will just watch random repeats on E! on a lazy weekday morning if I don’t have class. My newfound interest is funny because apparently the national interest in the infamous family is wavering. Kim’s robbery, Kendall’s myriad PR mishaps, Kylie’s ongoing plastic surgery rumours, Kourtney’s relationship drama, and Khloe’s latest break-up with another NBA star, Kris’s heartbreak over C(K)aitlyn’s book – all big moments yet failing to make the same impact as before. Charlamagne actually talked about this on a recent episode of The Brilliant Idiots, his podcast with Andrew Schulz, saying that in a world where Donald Trump is president, we no longer need reality tv. However, the point of highlighting this Refinery29 article was not to mention the Kardashians but to put a spotlight on Stephanie Shepherd, or Steph Shep as most of us know her. Shepherd is Kim Kardashian’s assistant, but, as the interview proves, she is so much more than that, encompassing the role of brand manager, friend, and general all-around helper. I find her job interesting because it is such a 24 hour role. I know that in most companies, the executive assistants work the same hours as their bosses which often means very early mornings and late nights, plus constantly being on call in the evenings, checking emails and messages. However, they get the weekend off when their boss isn’t in the office. Working for a celebrity is so different because there’s no such thing as a traditional work week. They don’t take the weekends off. They may be travelling constantly. It seems to me that Shepherd has given up much of her personal life for her job. Regardless, she comes across as genuine, earnest, and eager. Often profiles of people make them sound vapid, especially those who are in Hollywood, but the Refinery29 profile of Shepherd was fair and actually a really interesting read. I might end up becoming one of her 600k+ followers on Instagram. Not bad for an assistant. And remember, Kim started off as Paris Hilton’s assistant. How they rise!

“How Rachel Zoe is building an empire with female empowerment in mind” – Fashionista.com

Continuing on the theme of careers, Fashionista sat down and did an in-depth interview with Rachel Zoe. It’s impossible to think of the 2000s without thinking of Zoe. Her style was definitive of the decade with the army of Zoebots. Now she has transitioned into building her brand, moving away from celebrity styling almost completely. I just enjoyed reading this article so much because I have such a fondness for Rachel Zoe. She seems like a good person, she has perhaps my dream life, a wonderful family, and she has worked so hard. I find her inspirational and can only hope that I reach her level of success someday.

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Fashion, Weekly Words

Weekly Words: May 13th 2017

“The Greatest Moments in 80s Street Style” – Lone Wolf Magazine

I stumbled across this magazine’s website randomly this week and actually really liked the articles. This one in particular features a series of images of street style photographs from the 1980s, a decade that has been hot in fashion recently both on the runways and in-stores, encroaching on the general psyche en masse. I think people often have a negative perception of the 80s in terms of fashion because they think of an over-the-top generalization of the decade. Shoulder pads and polyester aside, a lot of really cool images, music, models, designers, and trends originated during this decade. The images show a lot of regular people (and Jackie Onassis) wearing the styles of the time in the most authentic way possible that we can never really recreate now. Plus, they have a photo of Demi Moore in St Elmo’s Fire which will always be the pinnacle of cool, style-wise, for me.

“Catching up with Tommy Ton, Street Style Photography Legend” – Grailed

Continuing on the street style theme of the previous article, Grailed did a great interview with Tommy Ton, one of the most prominent street-style photographers of the past decade. I enjoyed hearing about his career and why he chose to take a step back from publishing his images on Vogue and GQ’s online platforms (his contract was up and he doesn’t enjoy it as much as before, plus he does other work with brands now). He also discusses how he became a fashion collector (goals!) and the pieces that he is looking out for. This is particularly apt considering that Grailed is a high-end resale site. I thought it was a good way for them to incorporate editorial content with their site as it was actually an interesting interview yet they managed to tie it back into their service and link products similar to what Tommy Ton mentioned in the interview which they actually had for sale.

“Missy Elliott covers Elle USA”

I have posted this cover (or the accompanying editorial shots) on every social media network I have. I’m obsessed. Not only does Missy look amazing but this is actually an eye-catching cover, styled in a super cool way, and has such good makeup. It’s a win all around. I’m excited for this to turn up in my mailbox.

Photographer – Mark Seliger, Stylists – Misa Hylton & Samira Nasr 

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Fashion, Weekly Words

Weekly Words: May 6th 2017

“Monica Rose splits with the Kardashians” – various sources

Monica Rose with Gigi Hadid

The biggest story that has been unfolding over the past 10 days or so is that Monica Rose, the stylist responsible for the Kardashian-Jenner extended family getting any recognition for their clothing, has been unceremoniously fired by all of her main clients, including Gigi Hadid. I was genuinely shocked when the first article saying this broke and I continue to be shocked a week later. It’s so surprising because of how long they have worked together and how nasty the split seems to be. For one, they’ve all unfollowed Monica on Instagram, despite the fact that they have been longterm friends as well as having a professional relationship. As neither party has given a reason for the split and Rose has reportedly hired lawyers (with rumors that Khloe has intent to sue), people are speculating terrible things. I’ve read that people think Monica Rose was an insider on Kendall Jenner’s recent robbery. I really hope this is not true. If it’s all a lie, it’s so horrible that Monica Rose’s reputation is being dragged through the mud. Stylists lose clients all the time. That’s nothing new. However, losing this many all at once suggests it is a personal rift instead of just a change in direction. Furthermore, Kylie Jenner is now working with one of Monica’s former assistants. That must hurt. The truth will come out eventually, and until then I’m going to keep judgement free.

“French Government to Buy Five Designer Items Each Season” – WWD

Paris Refashioned at MFIT

According to this WWD article, the French government are beginning to build a permanent collection of fashion items in an effort to preserve the country’s “cultural heritage” and are going to be purchasing five items per season to do this. Paris has been the longstanding center of the fashion universe and the fashion industry is a source of national pride for the French. It only seems natural that they would honor this institution and create a lasting legacy. The acquired pieces will form a permanent collection at the National Center for Visual Arts and will be used in exhibitions here or loaned to other museums around the world. I personally am all for the conservation of garments. Fashion can be a work of art, and I think the clothing should be displayed in museums even from a sociological or anthropological standpoint. Fashion reflects culture and I think it’s hard to tell the tale of a time properly without visually representing it in some way. It’s crazy to think now that current season Saint Laurent or Vetements could be archived and spotted in museums in 30 years time, but that’s likely what will happen. Every moment we live in becomes history. The fun part will be choosing which five items get to live on forever.

“Kendall Jenner Faces Backlash Over Vogue India Cover” – Fashionista

The past few weeks have been rough for Kendall Jenner. It seems like every move she makes is being critiqued, but rightly so. I actually agree with the backlash for this cover because I think models should have some accountability too, especially those who are as famous as Jenner. The issue with the magazine cover is that instead of using an Indian model or celebrity on a cover celebrating the 10th anniversary of the magazine, they used another white model. It doesn’t sound like much to some people but really representation matters and if you grow up only seeing images of white women held to the highest beauty standards then you may grow up thinking that only white women are beautiful, can be successful etc. That was reducing the matter down to its simplest form and representation is definitely a deeper issue. I listened to Shiona Turini’s interview on Man Repeller’s “Oh Boy” podcast earlier this week (it’s like a year old, I’m just super into the podcast right now) and she spoke about how representation matters not just in magazines but across the board. When she was a young girl she didn’t see anyone who looked like her successful in fashions (whether that be as magazine editors, PR people, buyers etc.). Visually, it matters. I just think Kendall Jenner is catching so much heat nowadays because she shirks from her problems, ignores any criticism, and just simply deletes things and moves on, whilst cashing that paycheck at the end of the day. People joke about Pepsi because she never issued an apology and tries to act like it didn’t happen. She deleted her Fyre Festival posts instead of just issuing an apology like Bella Hadid did. There are so many little things that are adding up to create a PR disaster for Jenner and really if she just took a step back and apologized nobody would care anymore.

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Fashion, Weekly Words

Weekly Words: 29th April 2017

“Solange on Fashion vs Style, Her Pre-Teen Goth Phase, and How Confusing ‘Festival Style’ Is“- Fashionista.com

If you have spoken to me anytime in the past year or so, I’ll have mentioned Solange. I love her. She’s so pure and such an amazing artist. I love that she is no longer being referred to as Beyonce’s little sister and that she is being recognized as the great person she actually is. Also, I’m still desperately trying to get tickets to see her show at the Guggenheim in May but tickets are $900 on resale sites – they were originally $50. This interview, from Fashionista, was cool because it gave us more of an insight into Solange’s personal style. I think we all knew she was original when her wedding photos were revealed, with everyone wearing all white and standing in a perfect formation. I feel like every second of her life is an art piece. Read the article linked above to find out where she gets her inspirations from.

“Keeping Score: Brands Tally Bloggers’ Bots” – WWD

From WWD article

I have been talking a lot recently about how so many people on Instagram have fake followers, either that they have paid for or via bots that have followed them. I know I even have some bots following me and I have less than 500 followers. It came out last week that Instagress, a popular automation tool for IG, has been shut down. Instagram’s policy is that it does not allow third party applications but there are still plenty of services out there for people who are trying to amass a following. I always look at engagement rate on Instagram posts. The point of this article was that if a blogger with a huge following gets a low number of likes on a post, their following is likely fake. Vice versa, if a blogger with a small following gets an unproportionately large number of likes on a post, they may be using bots. There is a new service that brands can use to verify an influencers’ following and each influencer/blogger gets a score based on their engagement rates, bot rate etc. That way brands will pay a blogger a fee that is directly linked to their score instead of wasting money on posts that may not get the reach promised. It is also interesting as I have noticed a few articles out there recently about microinfluencers and how brands are moving towards using them as they tend to have a more engaged and loyal following. I find all of this social media stuff so interesting so this article was a good read.

Anna Wintour Interview (in two parts) – Business of Fashion


Anna Wintour sat down with Imran Amed, founder of the Business of Fashion website, for an interview that has been posted online in two parts. She is also the cover star for the print issue of the magazine. I found Anna’s interview to make her come across very well, as she always does, and I often wonder why she has the terrifying reputation that she does. She is someone who seems very aware of her own power but doesn’t seem to want to abuse it. She is also aware that Vogue needs to change to keep up with the times and actually welcomes that. I encourage you to read the interview for yourself as all I can really do is summarize what she said. I just think this interview showed us again why Anna Wintour is where she is and also why Business of Fashion is one of the best, if not the best, sources of fashion related content out there.

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Fashion, Weekly Words

Weekly Words: April 22nd 2017

“Calvin Klein Women’s Underwear Campaign Spring 2017”

Calvin Klein has released the women’s campaign for the underwear line, the second set of ads to come out under Raf Simons. Sticking to the brand heritage direction that Simons has taken since starting his new role, this campaign draws back to the 90s style of black and white imagery that Calvin Klein was known for. Sofia Coppola shot an age diverse cast of models for a video, followed by a series of short interviews where they reveal a moment or a fact. For example, in one of Kristen Dunst’s videos she talks about being insecure about her teeth then growing to love them. The videos are all available to watch on Calvin Klein’s YouTube channel, featuring the tagline “Calvin Klein, or nothing at all”: suggestive, with a double meaning, and similar to the infamous & paraphrased nothing between me and my Calvins said by Brooke Shields in the 80s.

Balenciaga’s $2,145 bag is just like Ikea’s 99 cent tote” – CNN

For sale at Barneys

In another classic case of “is this a joke or not?”, Balenciaga has retailed a bag costing over 2k that looks exactly like the industrial-style totes you can buy at Ikea for a dollar but this time made of leather. The CNN article, along with countless others, has brought the bag to international attention. I feel like the writer of the article may not know that Demna Gvasalia, the Creative Director of Balenciaga, also designs for Vetements as in the article they state: “In the age of high-fashion brands recreating cheap favorites — Vetements’ recreations of Hanes T-shirts for $740, for example — Balenciaga may just be jumping on the bandwagon.”

I personally think that selling this bag for the price they are is ridiculous, but I also understand that it is just a publicity stunt intended to generate buzz. Perhaps a few influencers will be spotted wearing it on Instagram but apart from that I think the aim is more so to bring attention to the Balenciaga brand. Also, Demna Gvasalia is someone who has fun with fashion and likes to poke fun at the industry in a way. This bag could be an inside joke, just like the DHL t-shirt was at Vetements (made because they used DHL messengers so frequently when they were shipping orders).

“Inside #RevolveFestival, An Influencer-Filled Weekend That Dominated the Coachella Party Scene” – Fashionista

So much love for this girl ❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️ @rachelzeilic @revolve #revolvefestival

A post shared by Olivia Culpo (@oliviaculpo) on

I spoke a lot about Coachella last week in preparation for the first weekend of the festival and I’ve honestly found it fascinating to read the coverage of the event afterwards. It seemed that Coachella was very much an influencer focused event this year with little attention on the music and plenty of shine on the outfits and parties. In fact, I probably seen more Instagrams from #HotelRevolve at #RevolveFestival than I did from people actually at Coachella. This article from Fashionista takes us inside the various events held by Revolve over the festival weekend and details the guests, the perks, and the happenings inside the parties. It seems that celebrities got lots of free stuff (of course) and extra special performances from musicians. The main point of these types of events, held by various brands during Coachella in venues outside of the festival grounds, is to generate publicity and, in turn, sales. However, the actual link between these events and sales is not yet proven with concrete evidence but judging by how much money brands sink into hosting these events plus the grand scale of them, I’m guessing it pays off. Read the article linked for further details on how the sponsored events work and also if you have a spare hour listen to this podcast from Fashionista which discusses Coachella and the whole sponsored festival dynamic in greater detail.

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