Advertising, Fashion

Calvin Klein “Moonlight” Ads

Previously on here I’ve mentioned how I was so obsessed with the #mycalvins campaign and how I was curious to see where things would go from there under Raf Simons. Now the first set of images under his tenure have been released and, honestly, I love them. The cast of Moonlight, Best Picture winner, look so amazing in the ads and I’ve realised that I prefer the stripped-back, minimalistic vibes so much more than the social media driven #mycalvins. In fact, it takes you right back to the heyday of CK in the early 90s. Shot by Willy Vanderperre, the campaign images are worthy of an exhibition. Every time I see one at a bus shelter I take a photo.

I’m interested in finding out more about how advertising works at Calvin Klein. As far as I’m aware they have their own in-house advertising department, meaning that it is somebody’s job to come up with the creative concepts exclusively for the brand. That must be so exciting during a transition time like this (especially with the entry of Raf Simons who is just insanely talented and influential), knowing that you are directly responsible for public perception of the brand.

Alex Hibbert

Alex Hibbert

Ashton Sanders

Ashton Sanders

Mahershala Ali

Mahershala Ali

Mahershala Ali

Mahershala Ali

Trevante Rhodes

Trevante Rhodes

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Advertising, Fashion

I love #mycalvins

Honestly, I love the #mycalvins ad series. It is one of the few things in fashion that has got me truly excited in the past few months. I’ve said it a few times before, fashion isn’t inspiring to me right now. I look in stores and I struggle to find any clothes that I want to buy. I flick through magazines and I do exactly that – flick through. Nothing is stopping me and grabbing my attention. That is, nothing apart from the #mycalvins ads.

Calvin Klein is a brand that I have been focused on a lot recently, purely because it is in an exciting transitional phase at the moment. Raf Simons is the new Creative Director and I am eagerly anticipating his first collection. I can’t wait to see what he does and what shift he makes. The departure of Francisco Costa was surprising to me but I am happy to see Raf again, just because I’m a fangirl (of course, if you’re into¬†fashun, you’re into Raf). I’ve actually written a couple of essays/reports about Calvin Klein for classes this semester, and I’ve chosen to do so for this reason.

The #mycalvins campaign is one of the most savvy digital campaigns I’ve ever seen. I’ve never wanted to engage with a hashtag before but it has me wanting to post a selfie wearing my own Calvin Klein underwear. Not only that but the casting of the ads are impeccable. They used a diverse range of models, musicians, and people who are really influential (but not influencers) to create a campaign that made young people want to be a part of it. Now more than ever before, in my opinion, do people want to rock Calvin Klein. Girls and guys.

What’s so funny to me is that Calvin Klein has moved from clothes to just underwear, graphic t-shirts and denim now (in most Millenials/Gen Z’s minds), perhaps as a result of the campaign and the spread of the brand to Instagram users around the world. Urban Outfitters has a range in almost every store I’ve visited. I have a friend who wore a Calvin Klein t-shirt with a pencil skirt (and looked damn good doing so). The casual element of the brand is so different than what the mainline collection presents.

I am just wondering if Raf will continue on in this current direction with his collections or if he will completely transform the brand into something different?¬†I like to keep in mind that Calvin Klein started off way back in the 60s and only entered in underwear market in the 80s, yet underwear is what most of us think of when we think of Calvin Klein. Everyone knows of the Kate Moss/Mark Wahlberg ads or the Brooke Shields (original) my Calvins ads. Maybe Raf’s direction will head back towards focusing on Calvin Klein Collection instead of Jeans and Underwear which seems to have overtaken in the young consumer’s mind. But maybe he doesn’t need to do that? Perhaps the beauty of the Calvin Klein brand is all of the different options available at the various price points. Not too many people can actually afford Collection. All in all, I love #mycalvins and I hope the campaign runs for at least another season.

Further reading

“Get familiar with 29 people in Calvin Klein’s Fall 2016 campaign” – Complex

“Unpacking Calvin Klein’s wildly successful #mycalvins campaign”¬†– Racked

“#mycalvins” interactive webpage (featuring Spotify playlists) – Calvin Klein

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Advertising, Celebrity & Red Carpet

Wolves – Kanye West x Balmain

Wolves is one of the Kanye West songs that I rarely listen to and it’s just because I don’t like Sia’s voice so I usually skip the song once it gets to her part. I’m glad he added Vic Mensa back in though. I like him. However, since the music video/Balmain campaign has been released I felt the need to watch from start to finish. Honestly, I really like it.

The lighting in the campaign highlights the clothes in the best possible way. The model selection is stellar. The art direction is on point. Kim looks beautiful, even when she is crying. Overall, I just found the video so visually appealing. The collaboration with Balmain made sense too and didn’t feel forced or awkward. Everyone looked like they were meant to be wearing the brand, not that they had been forced to, especially in the club scenes.

 

I’m excited to see the actual campaign images in magazines. There have been quite a few released so far via Instagram but it will be nice to actually see them on paper. So far, I think they’re the sort that I’ll tear out of the magazine and stick on my wall. I don’t even care about Kim Kardashian being in fashion anymore. She seems sweet and rather harmless really. Besides, if you had the opportunity to do what she does, wear the designers she does, go to the shows she does, wouldn’t you take that opportunity too?

 

Directed by Steven Klein
Creative Direction (of Balmain) by Olivier Rousteing
Concept and Creative Direction by Pascal Dangin

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Advertising, Fashion

Calvin Klein FW16 Ads – #mycalvins

#mycalvins is everywhere just now. It all started way back when Brooke Shields had the ever-so-risqu√© campaign with the slogan “nothing comes between me and my Calvins”, meaning her CK jeans. Last season the campaign was revived in the form of the aforementioned hashtag. Cashing in on teenagers who keep buying 90s CK from vintage stores and Urban Outfitters, plus¬†the thousands of girls who now pose on Instagram with¬†their underwear peeking out from their waistband with one man’s name on it, Calvin Klein, the brand, have enlisted celebrities and models to front the latest round of adverts. Once again, Calvin Klein is the it brand.

Last season’s casting drew criticism from Calvin Klein himself, saying that he didn’t like Kendall Jenner (who at the time fronted a campaign – I took a photo of the billboard when I seen it in New York because I actually like the image) but he did like Justin Bieber. Odd. There was also some minor controversy over Fetty Wap’s advert (featuring the slogan “I make money in #mycalvins) or more so, the placement of the advert next to one of a woman who “seduced” in her own ad. People cried gender roles etc. However, I think that was misplaced anger. There are so many other things to be mad about and you’re also probably doing exactly what the marketing department wanted you to do. Adverts are designed to draw attention to the product, and as they say, all publicity is good publicity (at least people are paying attention to it).

At first I thought this whole campaign and the idea behind it was slightly gimmicky, then I was drawn in. Like the iconic images of baby Kate Moss in the 90s, some of these images, I think, will be remembered in the same way. I think this season is even stronger than last. For example, Bella Hadid’s recently released shots with messages like “I mirror you in #mycalvins” are not only stunning images, but are so striking that on a billboard I think they’d make you stop and stare. They’re sexy but not in a trashy way. Very realistic for a young person nowadays, sort of in the same way that Kate’s images were 20 years ago. This is something that you can be a part of, as long as you buy the underwear/jeans/swimwear/whatever the fuck they’re selling us. It’s an intangible cool.

Tyrone Lebon is a really fantastic photographer. He shot my favourite British Vogue editorial (in literally years) on location in Jamaica, linked in an upcoming¬†post, and now he has shot this set of images. I think he has an interesting way of shooting people and it is rather distinct. I don’t know how to put into words what his photographs make me feel but I do know that I want to be a part of them. He makes everyone beautiful and soft and filtered, if that’s a way to describe things.

Apart from Bella Hadid’s images, I really like Anna Ewers’ set, Frank Ocean’s, Zoe Kravitz’s and Grace Coddington’s.

I wonder if these style of adverts will continue after a new creative director is appointed. Only time will tell.

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Advertising, Fashion

Brandon Maxwell’s First Ad Campaign – FW16

So happy to share with you this clip of our #BrandonMaxwell Fall/Winter 2016 Campaign Video, a love letter to my family. Full video is now up on www.brandonmaxwellstudio.com, link in bio! Thank you to @tmagazine for launching this first look! ‚̧ Shot @thestandard Thank you: Jessy Price Taylor Jordan Santiago Gonzalez Blanca Padilla Herieth Paul Maria Borges Riley Montana Ophelie Guillermand Leila Nda Next models Women Management NY IMG Models Tom Pecheux Samantha Lua Tie Tsukui Home Agency Wesley O‚ÄôMeara Helen Kenny Angela Elizalde Honey Artists Milk Studios Velem Jae Choi The Collective Shift Lauren Pistoia Karla Otto Lauren Phelps Ashley Temple Sandra Amador Natali Germanotta Anida Qermiaj Jay Lopez Fernando Souto Emily Kremer Santiago Gonzalez Cameron Dingwall Mark Sherman Jordyn Gatti Kristen Gehringer Sara Kinney and my family.

A post shared by Brandon Maxwell (@brandonmaxwell) on

 

I am blown away by this campaign. It is so beautiful and personal, and definitely representative of the life of a young designer.

Read Brandon Maxwell’s statement below (made on Instagram):

I’m so excited to be releasing our Fall/Winter 2016 campaign video and imagery over the course of this week! This project, which was photographed by me, is a very personal and full circle moment. I grew up wanting to make fashion photographs and spent almost every single weekend teaching myself to make clothes, doing my girlfriends’ hair and makeup, and staging photo shoots with disposable cameras anywhere we didn’t get kicked out. As I grew older, my love for making images slowly transitioned from being my hobby to being my identity. My passion for taking photographs kept me out of trouble, it gave me self confidence, it helped me find a focus and drive in my life, and it ultimately led me to pursue a college degree in photography, where I formed some of the most profound and creative friendships i’ve ever had. At a young age I dreamed what seemed at times like some very unrealistic dreams, but I always had faith that my life path could eventually lead me to making a living combining all the creative passions I truly loved if I pursued them with hard work, dedication, and honesty. I’m so incredibly grateful that it has. Nothing gives me as much pure joy than making clothes and photographing them, and I am so thankful to the loving team around me who supported my dreams and helped make this happen.

See the campaign in full here.

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Advertising

Thoughts on Kylie Jenner for Puma

The activewear market is growing rapidly and on top of that activewear is being worn outside of the gym, in daily life. Sneaker culture is now mainstream. Entire brands form and grow based on these concepts. Think of V-Files hoodies, Common Projects sneakers, and the whole rebirth of forgotten sportswear brands of the nineties like Ellesse (now sold at Topshop) and Fila. Luxury brands like Balenciaga and Chanel both sell sneakers. Calvin Klein bras and briefs peek out from underneath, what seems like, 80% of teenage girls clothes. Yoga pants and running tights are worn as regular pants and sports bras are worn as crop tops. Basically, this whole segment of the market is booming and brands want to cash in on that.

In my opinion, Puma has always been known primarily for its suede sneakers. Apart from that it isn’t a brand I’ve ever thought about. It’s not quite as big as the two big hitters, Nike and Adidas, and I feel that it sometimes gets left behind. How funny is it that the founders of Adidas and Puma were brothers? Puma’s revenue is around $9bn less than Adidas annually.¬†The partnership with Rihanna was designed to bring it back into the international psyche. It is now fashionable. In order to cash in on all things fashionable and now, they got a Kardashian/Jenner involved. Of course.

I don’t like Kylie Jenner for Puma. It is weird. For one, I think Khloe should’ve got the activewear endorsement job since she’s the one who is all about working out. Secondly, the campaign images released seem so out-of-touch, culturally appropriative, and just awkward. Thirdly, I’d much prefer Rihanna.

I understand that Rihanna has a different kind of partnership with the brand in the form of Fenty Puma, a range of clothes and shoes that even got its own runway show, whilst she is serving as the creative director of womenswear for Puma, so she will likely promote that line. The fur slides have sold out multiple times. However, the Kylie Jenner/Puma connection is a little bit unclear. When it was announced there was great controversy due to Kanye West denouncing claims that Kylie had her own deal with Puma on account of his, extremely successful, partnership with Adidas. I’m guessing this one was worked out behind closed doors because lo and behold, here we have the images of Kylie, styled by Monica Rose, splattered all across social media.

I just find them awkward. They feel contrived. Kylie would never be in a scenario like she is placed in for the ads so it feels so unnatural. In one image, she stands with one foot up on the subway seat, surrounded by graffiti, wearing glasses reminiscent to Cazals (the glasses worn famously by New York hip-hop artists in the 80s like Darryl McDaniels of Run DMC). She wears a gold knuckleduster. In another she stands at a pay phone holding pitbulls on a chain. Who even uses pay phones nowadays? Her tan is so deep¬†at first glance I thought she was Latina (probably the look they were going for, in all honesty). It is appropriation of hip-hop culture by a rich white girl, 100%. But that’s Kylie’s whole look. Check her Instagram for some cornrows and Yeezy merch posted mere hours after the Puma ads were released.

 

The only way a Kylie Jenner x Puma collab would’ve worked would be if they photographed her by the pool in Calabasas or, on the beach in Malibu, or in a selfie style campaign. Instead of putting her in fake situations, let her document her daily life and how she incorporates¬†streetwear¬†into it. Make it like one of her Instagram posts, but on a grander level. Sort of like how Kendall did the selfies for Vogue a couple of years ago (that weren’t really selfies), I think Kylie acting more at home and in a situation that is not entirely alien to her would seem authentic. Instead this has come off as awkward and false.¬†It’s like they’re trying to glorify a life that Kylie has clearly never led in an attempt to reach consumers who can relate. However, there is nothing more off-putting than one of America’s richest and most famous teens trying to sell you an image of the struggle, the daily hustle. Plus, this does nothing to squash people’s claims of her trying to look black (and profiting off their culture) whilst reaping all the benefits of white privilege. Kylie is not fully to blame for this but she is an active participant.

Overall, I just found the campaign rather unappealing. I feel like it is actually undoing the hard work Rihanna has put in to make the brand one of the cool athletic brands again. It may stand shoulder to shoulder with Nike and Adidas one day (although they are always in a league of their own) and I do think that this campaign will help Puma as a brand, only because everything that the Kardashian/Jenner family touches turns to gold.

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Advertising, Fashion, Fashion News, Opinion

The American Apparel Issue

I think it is about time that I address this issue, you know, American Apparel and all things surrounding it.¬†Things have been pretty volatile for the company in the past few months and there’s no sign that things will calm down. It started with the firing of the former-CEO and founder Dov Charney over claims of sexual misconduct, and since then a storm has been brewing…

American Apparel is, essentially, an overpriced basics brand. But still people buy it. People are willing to pay the prices they charge, say¬†$20 for a basic t-shirt¬†over the¬†$5.95 for the same at H&M, for various reasons. First of all, their clothes are of good quality. You know that when you buy a pair of leggings here you don’t have to worry about everyone seeing the outline of your underwear, or more. Their bodysuits are made of thick cotton material, and with¬†this wrap-style, in particular, you don’t need to worry about the crossover not staying put and gaping like it can do with some cheaper bodysuits made of flimsier material (I have personal experience with this, believe me. I’ve even had to stitch a cheaper one together to prevent it from showing all!). American Apparel have a pretty good selection of products considering they almost solely produce basics. They’ve got every kind of t-shirt you could ever want, denim, bodysuits, lots of spandex, and pretty much any other “basic” you could think of.

Dov Charney in an AA store

Dov Charney in an AA store

I say they’re overpriced because they really are in comparison to their competitors. When you go to American Apparel you pay more than you would at H&M or Topshop for very similar items. For example, American Apparel’s Easy Jean and Topshop’s Joni jeans are virtually the same but they’re priced at $78 and $65 respectively. Then on top of that, H&M often have their own version of the jeans for around $25. Sometimes you do question what you’re paying for.

But American Apparel do have one thing that sets them apart from most of the competition: they manufacture in Los Angeles, and their prices reflect that. Workers get a fair wage, work reasonable hours, and get healthcare benefits (something that many workers don’t even get). The damn slogan of the company is “Made in the USA – Sweatshop Free”. What more can you say?
A lot of their garment workers are immigrants, often from Mexico or other Latin American countries, which has been the subject of some controversy in the past. The company fully employs vertical integration, meaning they are involved at all three stages of production and therefore have more control. This also bumps up prices. The company is meant to be a pretty great place to work, especially if you’re a garment worker who is used to working 16 hours a day for a wage that is just not enough to live off of.

To summarise so far, the company has good ethics and the whole idea behind it is sound. But that’s not the point. If everything was so great there would be literally no point in me writing this. Things have gone awry recently, triggered by allegations of sexual misconduct by the former CEO Dov Charney, who was suspended from his role last summer and officially terminated in December 2014.

Now let me say, these are all allegations. He has not legally been charged with anything.¬† It would be unfair to assume that they are true as he has not been convicted, but it would also be unfair to dismiss his reported victims. It is a tricky situation. I have to say though, there’s no smoke without fire (or however the quote goes). There have been numerous claims and lawsuits against Charney since the mid-2000s and I¬†refuse to believe that¬†all these women would lie.¬†Charney’s dismissal was possible as the company went public a few years ago meaning he just became the majority shareholder and no longer the actual owner. The board of directors chose to oust him.

After Charney’s dismissal, the company brought in a new CEO, Paula Schneider, who many have said is under-qualified for the role. In my opinion, her experience is enough but what she has done so far has not been good.

Under her leadership the brand has started to photoshop out pubic hair and nipples. Now that might not sound like such a big deal but for this brand it is. You see, American Apparel has always celebrated the natural body. They embraced pubic hair in a culture where female body hair below the eyelashes is heavily frowned upon. They took you back to a simpler, perhaps better, time. At one point their mannequins even sported a full bush, which created much ado on social media.

Then in regards to the nipple, it is really false advertising. I mean, it’s a sheer bra that they airbrushed so surely that’s not showcasing the product in its true form? Furthermore, the whole Free the Nipple movement speaks out against the double standard involving male and female nipples (I fucking hate the word nipple, why do I keep typing it?) and American Apparel has been one of the few brands that can be counted on to show the real female body. It’s just quite disappointing that they’ve done this.

The photoshopping has been done in an attempt to make the brand a little less sexualised, something that it has been known for. Its use of racy imagery is one of the things that garnered so much attention. Paula Schneider, the new CEO, said that the brand didn’t have to be so “overtly sexual”, hence all the changes. The brand has also came under much criticism for its apparent sexualisation of young girls, most recently shown in an advert where the model wears a short school girl type skirt and is bent over. However, you don’t see the model’s face so her age is not apparent.

Perhaps the last straw, and the latest news surrounding the company, is that they will no longer use “instagram thots” as models, revealed in a leaked email. Although it was pretty hilarious, it is a step in the wrong direction for the company. The email was a brief for an upcoming model casting, saying that real models would now be used instead of “thots” and “hoes” (apparently a joke between colleagues). I think it is fair to say that the new management is trying to rebrand. However, is taking away the famous real girls in their ads a good idea? That is one of the things they’re most popular for. They don’t use regular skinny models; they use normal girls who in the past have been handpicked by Dov Charney. It is one of the things that makes the brand relatable, with diverse models in both race and body type.

The now infamous leaked casting email

The now infamous leaked casting email. It has also been stated that the new VP of Marketing wants Eastern European or Russian models who are taller and thinner than the girls they typically use.

I know that Paula Schneider has been hired to revamp the company and to steer it away from the controversy created by Dov Charney but is her way of doing things the right way? American Apparel is a brand that has relied on provocative and often very sexualised images since its inception: that is what it is known for, and that’s why people love it. To take it completely away from this wouldn’t make sense, so I find myself wondering how far she will go. Airbrushing nipples and pubic hair is a big step to take, especially for the liberal brand which has celebrated both things in the past.

Since Charney’s dismissal, things have just gone downhill. Now I’m not saying that he should be reinstated, especially if the claims about him are found to be true, but I do think that something needs to be done. “30 manager and director level employees sent the board a letter protesting the decision [to dismiss Charney]” according to a letter obtained by Buzzfeed (which can be read in full here), so perhaps many employees would welcome his return. He is very popular amongst the garment workers too as he has been a long term fighter for immigration reform. The factory employees have been rather dissatisfied since the new management stepped in and they’ve faced reduced working hours and layoffs. The Hermandad Mexicana has created a group called the Coalition of American Apparel Factory Workers that wholeheartedly supports Dov and calls for his return. They have a WE <3 DOV logo similar to the infamous I <3 NY campaigns.¬†Furthermore, the SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) has launched a formal investigation into the matter of Charney’s dismissal so it looks like he won’t be disappearing fully any time soon.

I don’t know what the right thing to do is. If I did, I would be the one running shit at American Apparel. But what I do know is that this is not the way things should be going. I don’t mean to defend the overt sexualisation of women but if it is consensual then what is the issue? American Apparel is a brand that has never strayed far from controversy, but now they’re getting it for the wrong reasons. I hate to say it, but free the goddamn nipple!

Further reading…

I enjoyed (is that the right word to use?) reading these two profiles of Dov Charney from 2004 and 2005 which revealed the environment that he used to work in and the type of person he was. Written for the now defunt Jane magazine, the writer has posted the articles on her own blog which is actually an archive of her work, the profiles are slightly disturbing in some aspects and once you read them you can understand where all of the sexual harassment claims come from.

Meet Your New Boss” – June/July 2004 by Claudine Ko

Extended Play” – October 2005 by Claudine Ko

 

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Advertising

Keeping it in the Family: Lanvin SS15 Campaign

A mother-daughter duo is a bond that is often¬†so strong that it is unbreakable. Family is so important to most people and certainly matters to me. Fashion is notoriously catty so having your mother there to have your back must be wonderful and a great privilege. This may all sounds a little bit out of the blue but it has a purpose. I’m talking about my favourite mother-daughter duo in the industry and probably the only one I’ll ever champion: Pat & Anna Cleveland.

During the internship I did last summer I had the chance to spend some time with Anna Cleveland. She was the first real model who I’d ever met and did a brilliant job of smashing every stereotype and clearing up every misconception that there could be about models. Firstly, she was the sweetest girl, so kind and so funny. Secondly, she ate all the damn time and it wasn’t just rabbit food. And finally, she did not look unhealthily skinny: not at all. But she was super tall: that is one thing about models that are true.

Before I met Anna, I didn’t know she existed. I did know about, and was already a fan, of her mother. I first read about Pat Cleveland in the book¬†The Beautiful Fall¬†which is a wonderful biography that parallels the lives of Yves Saint Laurent and Karl Lagerfeld in the 70s and beyond. According to the book, it was a time of high glamour but equally high competition. The two designers’ careers turned out very differently but their social circles were largely the same. Pat was a model who came over from the States and had lots of wild fun in Paris. The book makes you wish you were there to have experienced it all as they seemed to have a totally hedonistic, carefree life. After reading about Pat, I looked up some photos of her and discovered that she was actually a good model as well as party girl.

 

Usually, like most fashion-outsiders, I’m not a fan of nepotism which is what Anna’s entry into fashion is (in plain and simple terms). However, I don’t mind it in this case. Anna has been working for years and usually only walks a select few shows. She stays loyal to designers who have helped her (Zac Posen, Karl Lagerfeld etc) which I like. Also, she’s a nice person which helps my perception of her. Now this campaign has come along with her and her mother and I love it.

Lanvin did a similar campaign last year¬†with Edie Campbell and her family but I wasn’t fussed for that. I love this one because I think it is such a strong photo. Their faces are framed wonderfully and they look more like twins than mother and daughter. There were also a few other fashion family portraits in the adverts but Pat & Anna’s was my favourite.

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Advertising, Fashion News

Best Fashion Campaigns of The Moment: Prada, Chanel & Givenchy

I am a very visual person. I decide in an instant if I like something or not, purely based on appearance and snap-judgements. Perhaps that is why I adore fashion: it is a very visual field. It is all about the aesthetic and little about the substance on the surface, it is personal choice if you decide to dig deeper. One of my favourite ways to look at fashion is through the advertising campaigns put out by the brands at the start of each season: they run in the magazines, are occasionally pasted onto bus stops and are splattered all over the internet. An advert, if successful, will make you want to buy something from the brand. That is the whole point of advertising, to draw in customers and increase sales. However, a fashion advert is different to a regular advert that you would see for a can of beans or some washing powder. Yes, the Heinz brand name sells the product similar to the way that the Hermes name sells a bag and yes, if you use that particular brand of detergent you are buying into a certain lifestyle but really it is not the same. Fashion adverts are an extension of an editorial, in my eyes. If they are worthwhile, they are inspirational or should I say aspirational? When I look at the ad campaigns for some of my favourite brands, I don’t see the dollar signs but I see the story. The advert is a real-life representation of the house. It lets you know a little bit more about the brand, like who their ideal girl is. I mean, how else would we know exactly that the Miu Miu girl is the¬†kooky little sister of Prada, slightly mischievous and a whole lot of fun, if that idea wasn’t reiterated in the adverts time and time again?

At this current moment, there are countless new adverts coming out since we are now entering the new season. In a little less than a month, fashion “month” will be upon us again hence signalling the beginning of the Spring 2015 season (even though what is being presented is for FW15). It is easy to get a little bit lost in the seasons, especially considering that these days celebrities have worn half of the next-season collections before they have hit the stores or are even ready to pre-order. When you see these clothes in the adverts again or actually being used in editorials, you are reminded that they are, in fact, current season and that celebrities live in another world. A world without waiting times…

Regardless, the excitement of seeing certain clothes in print makes the wait worthwhile. I always love seeing what pieces from the collections (especially since many have over 50 looks) actually make it into the ads as surely the best of the best are chosen. I also love how sometimes, say you didn’t quite get the collection the first time you seen it or you just didn’t like it, the adverts can totally change your opinion on certain pieces. I know that that has happened for me personally time and time again with collections that I hated first time around then loved in print. Alternatively, the opposite can happen.

This season, the three campaigns that I adore the most are Prada, Chanel & Givenchy. Firstly, with this seasons’ Prada, I liked it straight away. The show was opened by Gemma Ward who is subsequently starring in the campaigns, shot by Steven Meisel… obviously. I find it slightly hilarious how people have been calling for her return online for, literally, 5 years at least and were shot down. Now she is back and in a big way. I have noticed that one of the main features of this collection (and also the menswear collection), the visible seams and stitching, has already made its way onto the high street but only in menswear so far: I seen a new season shirt in Topman but I can’t find it online for the life of me. I think what is so wonderful about the Prada brand is that 9 times out of 10, they get the ad campaigns spot on. Even the ones that I think I didn’t like at the time grow on me months later (take Fall¬†2014 as an example). I also adore the Resort campaign for the brand so I will include that in this list. I have one of the images stuck up on my bedroom wall as I love it so much: maybe I should frame it?

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Second is Chanel. After putting Gisele Bundchen in the current Chanel No5 perfume adverts (the You’re The One That I Want campaign), Karl has chosen her to front the brand’s Spring 2015 adverts also. Now if you remember, the collection was all about revolution, they staged a feminist protest at the show. However, I’m not sure that it is clear to see from the adverts. The whole concept is Chanel Paris After Dark, or #chanelparisafterdark if you want to go all Instagram correct, and they follow Gisele around various locations in the beautiful city including the infamous Love Lock bridge. I think the result is a million times better than some previous season adverts (take the boxing-style campaign with Cara Delevingne and Binx Walton) and is actually rather fitting for the brand.

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Finally, I adore the latest Givenchy adverts. On Tumblr, there are a set of¬†super risqu√© images¬†going around featuring a whole lot of sex, both heterosexual and homosexual, and lots of skin:¬†these are fake. Then there is also the more tame, commercial version which are the same images minus the explicit pictures: or should I say the real version. Julia Roberts also stars in the adverts, looking moody and, quite frankly, fucking brilliant along with models Imaan Hammam (my latest love, along with Prada-exclusive and my current goal in life Aya Jones), Stella Lucia & Mica Arganaraz, whose hair in the adverts reminds me slightly of Gia’s. I find the¬†edits¬†oddly funny and wish that they were genuine, just to cause a stir and wind people-up. Can you imagine the look on people’s faces when they flicked open Vogue to see that?

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Gucci F/W 2014 Campaign

As the new season is approaching, all the campaigns are coming out Рso far this Gucci one is my favourite.

L-R Suvi Koponen, Natasha Poly, Karmen Pedaru, Nadja Bender, Anja Rubik, Joan Smalls & Raquel Zimmerman

L-R Suvi Koponen, Natasha Poly, Karmen Pedaru, Nadja Bender, Anja Rubik, Joan Smalls & Raquel Zimmerman

I think it helps that I really liked the collection this season so was obviously excited to see what the campaign would be like. I think it is beautiful. The hair is tousled and the make-up is that natural yet smoky look that is oh so difficult to achieve.

Natasha Poly

Natasha Poly

 

I’d say the line-up of models works so well together. And as I am stuck in the mid-2000s with my taste in models for the most part, I am always excited to see Natasha Poly in campaigns. Also, the next time I go to the hairdressers I am taking this campaign for reference purposes because Nadja’s hair is so stunning.

Anja Rubik (and the skirt)

Anja Rubik (and the skirt)

Nadja Bender - see how wonderful her hair is!!

Nadja Bender – see how wonderful her hair is!!

Suvi Koponen

Suvi Koponen

Give me Natasha’s coat, Anja’s skirt and Suvi’s boots and I would be forever grateful.

See all the images here.

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