Fashion

Weekly Words: 16th September 2017

Departures & New Arrivals

There has been a lot of movement already this fashion month and we just left New York. Instead of the changes coming at the fashion houses, it’s the media side of things where all of the changes are happening – specifically, in editorial staff at the top American magazines. In a somewhat shocking move, it was announced that Graydon Carter, 25 year editor of Vanity Fair, was stepping down from his position at the end of the year. This is a loss that will definitely be felt, from his often hilarious editor’s letter to his casual beef with the president and his overarching presence on the whole world of Vanity Fair as a whole. It is the only magazine which I can consistently read cover to cover and I hope the quality remains high. There is currently no word yet on who his replacement will be but apparently he left to protect himself from having to engage in huge layoffs to his editorial team, something that VF has effectively managed to avoid thus fur but that is inevitable given the Conde Nast giant that backs them and the company-wide restructuring which has cost many employees their jobs. In the same week, Conde Nast lost another Editor-in-Chief. This time, it was Cindi Leive, 16-year editor of Glamour Magazine. Her successor is also yet to be announced although there are a couple of internal Conde Nast names in the running including the Teen Vogue EIC, Elaine Welteroth (NY Times did a great profile on her recently). However, I’d love it if Welteroth would stay at Teen Vogue because she has really changed that magazine for the better, making its content arguably more substantial than any other teen magazine in history, competing with major digital platforms like Refinery29. I find myself reading Teen Vogue articles online daily and I’m not even in their core target demographic anymore.

The next departure is that of Robbie Myers from Elle Magazine. Another editor-in-chief who has been at their position for almost two decades, Myers left to spend more time with her family and has instead moved to a consulting role for Hearst, the owner of Elle and rival of Conde Nast. Both of the major publishing companies have made changes in the past week. Myers replacement was announced very quickly though, giving the idea that her decision has been known about much longer than Carter’s at VF. Nina Garcia, a beloved editor and public figure (think Project Runway), is the new EIC, effective next Monday. I’m excited about this announcement because I think it is a role that Garcia definitely deserves. She does a lot of good things in the industry and seems to be a genuine, nurturing person who cares about fashion and wants to see young designers grow and flourish. I’m glad that I renewed my Elle subscription because I’m excited to see what direction she will take the magazine in.

Finally, NYLON Magazine, a top indie magazine of the 2000s turned e-commerce site / blog, has shuttered its print division, ceasing publication of the magazine (digital only now) and firing their entire print staff. This news has been met with fury from many staffers who feel they were the heart and soul of the magazine. It is horrible when people are thrown out of their jobs with no warning, and especially when the company didn’t even try to transition them into the digital roles. How could your print beauty editor not write the same stories for online? Seems crazy. NYLON isn’t a magazine that I have ever read or really connected to so I don’t take this loss too personally, but I do think it is sad because I am a big fan of print magazine and I don’t want to see the industry crumble. There are always whispers of which publication will go down next and it is sad when they actually do. Digital isn’t the only way forward, you know. If magazines don’t have the budget to produce monthly, they should go quarterly. Take CR Fashion Book as an example of a great fashion magazine which started off independent and then was bought by a large publishing house (whilst still retaining it’s publishing calendar). Then there are smaller publications like Emily Oberg’s Sporty & Rich, which is essentially a zine that she publishes periodically. Maybe small is the way to go? Whatever the solution, in my opinion, going digital only isn’t the best idea. How do you convert your print readership to digital only? How do you push through all of the noise online? These are things that magazines and their higher-ups need to work out.

Myers and Garcia

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Fashion, Fashion Week

New York Fashion Week Highlights – Spring 2018

I’d like to start this by saying that I am so over New York Fashion Week and, as I write this, we are only halfway through. I’ve had this conversation with a few people already and I have come to the realization that fashion week, now more than ever, is just a spectacle and not at all reflective of the fashion industry as a whole. I am disappointed to see coverage on the shows focusing on the models or the afterparties instead of the clothes (often with zero mention of the actual designs), coming from actual media brands and magazines all the way down to microinfluencers on social media. It is now totally clear that fashion week is just a marketing vehicle, but who for? In my opinion, fashion week is about models and influencers building their brands even more than actual fashion brands. It is all about what shows people have attended (and sat front row, and snapchatted, and Instagrammed) and what model is going to be the newest socialite with the most followers online. It’s really sad to be honest. However, I think that actual buyers and people who attend the shows because it is their business to be there are still, obviously, working hard and are detached from the whole circus of it – Man Repeller actually published a good piece about the Alexander Wang show which I felt summed this up, sort of. This New York Times article was a fantastic take on this topic too. Anyway, I’m going to follow a similar format as I did last season and post images of looks that I particularly loved and also link you to some others. Let fashion month commence!

Rachel Zoe showed her collection before fashion week started in Los Angeles. I loved this print worn by both Zoe herself and Chrissy Teigen at the presentation. Funnily enough, I was sitting a couple of tables away from Zoe during her birthday dinner at Chateau Marmont the weekend before.

I love this look from Rachel Comey from head to toe. I want the earrings. Since interning at an e-commerce site I have a newfound appreciation for the brand as I’ve seen how well her products photograph and how they can be worn so easily in a woman’s daily life.

Rosetta Getty presented another collection which I can see future me wearing (like me as a 35 year old mom lol). I’m always a fan.

Rosetta Getty, again.

Tom Ford’s show was great because he was referencing himself at Gucci, and everyone in fashion looooooved Tom Ford for Gucci. I’m loving his brand more and more as time goes by. This orange coat looks amazing on the model’s skin tone too.

Tom Ford again, and Gigi looks great.

A look at Tom Ford.

I love this romper from Kendall + Kylie. Plus, shoutout to the model Bella Harris! I have shot with her before and she is such a sweetie and really beautiful.

Brock Collection was so romantic and pretty and felt very Spring.

Brock Collection again, giving me Dolce & Gabbana vibes.

I am always here for strappy dresses and matching belts!! Brock Collection, again.

I like this dress by Cinq a Sept. I always stop and look at their stuff in Bloomies.

I love the shape of the bra tops from Adam Selman. He did these in a couple of colors.

Cute, (almost) underwear dressing at Adam Selman.

So obsessed with this menswear look at Calvin Klein. I’d like to see A$AP Rocky in this.

Interesting effects at Calvin Klein.

So pretty but also like blotches of blood. American Horror Story at Calvin Klein.

Liya + Vinyl = Love, at Calvin Klein.

There were a lot of cool looks at Kith, not just for the hypebeasts.

I really loved all of the asymmetric dresses at Jason Wu. I hope this trickles down into fast-fashion.

My favorite look from the Jason Wu show.

I love the two different weights of polka dot in one dress, at Jason Wu.

Say yes to the ruching! At Jason Wu

I want this to add to my collection of black dresses, at Jason Wu.

An updated shirtdress (and the best / most wearable hair and make-up of fashion week) at Hellessy.

I love this color and the way the fabric sashays at Cushnie et Ochs.

Retro style with the matching belt and a super flattering cut at Brandon Maxwell.

I love this glamorous look on Romee Strijd (who I also love at the moment thanks to her vlogs) at Brandon Maxwell.

I love the tied up neck at Prabal Gurung.

The strongest Fenty X Puma collection yet.

Mid-2000s chic at Fenty x Puma.

Sexy with a twist at Fenty X Puma.

I loved too many looks from Alexander Wang to include them all. One thing I don’t like is the runway debut of Kaia Gerber this season (a 16 year old who posts the most risque photos on IG). Let kids be kids.

!!!!! at Alexander Wang

Alexander Wang does Chanel

Two shirts in one at Alexander Wang.

Anna Ewers looking very glam at Alexander Wang.

Marc Jacobs was actually so great this season. I looooove the turbans. So glamorous.

Another great look from Marc Jacobs.

My favorite look of NYFW in general, c/o Marc Jacobs.

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Fashion, Opinion

Flappers Didn’t Wear Fringe

A vital historical inaccuracy which we continue to perpetrate is the premise of flappers wearing fringe. I didn’t actually know this was the case until I read an article on Racked detailing the history of the infamous flapper dress. Think about every flapper costume you’ve ever seen on Halloween, any photoshoot in a magazine, any movie set in the jazz age – the dresses all look the same. Short and flirty with lots of fringing. Only when Hollywood tried to portray the 1920s party girls on the big screen did the extra fringing, filled with embellishments, become part of the look – and it was done for that reason, the look. Hollywood costume designers embellished the dresses so they were striking on screen, catching the light and sparking for the cameras. Real flappers didn’t wear heavy fringe. Nor did they wear super short dresses. The hemlines of their dresses were much longer than the above-the-knee styles that we wear today, and although that length seems “long” for modern standards it would’ve been too risque, too scandalous for the 1920s.

On the back of this inaccuracy, I began to think about other periods in fashion. When we think of each decade, we tend to be able to give a vague description of the styles. For example, the 1950s conjure up the full-skirted prom style dresses and Americana – blue jeans and white t-shirts like what James Dean wore. The 1960s are mini skirts and go-go boots. The 1970s are hippy-chic with flares. The 1980s are all about big, big, big with shoulder pads and power suits. The 1990s are minimalist. The 2000s were tacky-chic. But what is the present day? And what will they get wrong about us in the future?

The 2010s have been strange. Nothing new has come out of this time period in terms of fashion. Everything is instead a look back to the past. That can even be seen in the styles of denim we wear. Something as small as jeans can show a lot about culture. We started the 2010s off in skinny jeans, a run over from the 2000s when bootcut jeans disappeared to be replaced by skinny jeans, originally called drainpipes. Even these were a hark back to the past, popularized by the likes of the Rolling Stones in the 60s or even Elvis Presley in the 50s. Acid wash was a popular style in 2011 – 2012, and this was a reach back to the 80s. High waisted styles of skinnies were popular too, always with lots of elastane inside.

The silhouette got a little bit more relaxed for some people starting in (I think) 2013 when Topshop introduced the Mom jeans. Originally intended as a little bit of a joke, Mom jeans are meant to be like the jeans worn by mothers in the 1980s and 90s. High-waisted, rigid denim in an often unflattering shape, they tend to flatten and elongate your butt. I never got into these. Early adopters started wearing these towards the beginning of the decade but by 2015 onwards they were as commonplace as skinny jeans. It has now gotten to the stage where people have proclaimed skinny jeans to be dead (but we all know they will never be gone fully).

In 2017, the most coveted jean style is a pair of vintage light blue Levi’s that make your butt look amazing. Some people DIY the hems to be raw edge too. If buying vintage isn’t looking back to the past, I don’t know what is. We are in a phase where anything goes now. Denim is embellished, ripped, slashed, frayed, patched. Anything you can do to jeans, we now do. I think the increasingly casual way of dress and the impact of denim is what the 2010s will be remembered for.

Danielle Bernstein from WeWoreWhat in vintage Levi’s

What about denim will they be able to get wrong in the future? In 2050, when they are making a movie set in the 2010s how can they really go wrong when we have everything all at once? I just hope people keep their old Topshop jeans because, genuinely, I use the new Topshop styles as an indicator of where things are going with denim -100%.

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Fashion, Weekly Words

Weekly Words: 9th September 2017

Instead of focusing on news stories this week, I thought I would highlight some editorials/magazine covers that I have spotted and really loved. As I’ve said a zillion times before on here, I don’t love Kim Kardashian. However, she has been involved in two great photoshoots which have been released over the past couple of weeks that I feel would be a shame not to share. She is actually fairly versatile as a model so that’s one thing I will give her. Her Harper’s Bazaar Arabia shoot was to die for. I love the Cher inspiration and it is nice to see her channeling another Armenian icon. Kardashian herself is a huge fan of Cher, having posted various images of her as inspiration on her Instagram a few months back (and losing millions of followers whilst doing so), so it is cool to see her doing a shoot that you know she would’ve actually been really excited to participate in. The second shoot is the Interview cover which Kim shares with her daughter North (aka the cutest kid in North America). There has been some controversy over this shoot because Kim’s skin tone is a lot darker than what it is in real life (and the same shade as her daughter, which is impossible given that her daughter is half African-American and Kim is White & Armenian) and also because people think that Kim channeling Jackie Kennedy is in poor taste (apparently she is not classy enough to be a first lady, but I beg to differ given the current administration). However, the shoot is cute. It is a fun historical take on fashion, and it features Kim in styles that we wouldn’t normally expect from her. Finally, I wanted to show off the Bella Hadid covers for Vogue Brasil. Bella has broken a world record for being on the most Vogue covers in one month, formerly held by Doutzen Kroes. Out of all of the international editions of the magazine that she is featured on, I like the Brazilian cover the best. They are fun, retro, and give me serious Carla Bruni vibes. Now that I think about it, Bella can look like Carla in some photos. If nothing, looking like a true supermodel from the 80s is the highest compliment a model can receive.

Harper’s Bazaar Arabia – Kim Kardashian West by Mariano Vivanco, styled by Simon Robins

Full editorial here.

Interview Magazine – Kim Kardashian West & North West by Steven Klein, styled by Patti Wilson

Full editorial here.

Vogue Brasil – Bella Hadid by Gui Paganini, styled by Yasmine Sterea

Full editorial here.

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Fashion, Shopping

Exposure

 

A months or so ago, Fashionista.com published an article entitled “Free the Nipple: How the NSFW Runway Trend Translates to Retail”, a story about how nipples are prominent on the runway, often exposed through sheer fabrics or implied via the whole no-bra look, and how this movement has now reached fast-fashion stores and mass-acceptance. I’d agree with this. Perhaps it’s just living in New York and attending a very liberal school, but I’d say this is definitely the case. Most people aren’t afraid to go braless anymore, something that was frowned upon just a few years ago, and some people go even further. I remember watching a Seinfeld episode where Elaine buys her friend a bra as a gift because her friend always goes braless and gets so much attention. In turn, her friend then wears just the bra and no shirt to make a point. It was funny and classed as totally scandalous at the time, yet nowadays it is totally normal.

I created a few looks on Polyvore, as shown above, which feature either bras as shirts, bralets, mesh shirts, or lacy sheer bodysuits. I wanted to show the various different ways you could style this look for different occasions. I find myself wearing similar outfits on the regular and not feeling risque in the slightest. It’s funny how quickly things become norms.

The Fashionista article was particularly interesting because it was in the long form, something that they don’t do too often, and featured an interview with a trend forecaster who offered further insight into the matter. I’m always interested in what trend forecasting agencies have to say because they are meant to be the people who know what is happening in fashion before it even happens. At my school, we have access to databases like WGSN where we can see trend forecasts for the upcoming seasons, the same level of access that brands and other organizations can pay for. I find it fascinating to see if they are actually right or not. Often they are.

Read the article that I linked above and let me know what you think about this “trend”, if you can even call women’s body parts a trend (which is a whole other talking point).

Further reading

“Free the Nipple” – information from the organization pioneering the current version of the movement

“Free the Nipple founder Lina Esco on fighting the fight for gender equality” – i-D magazine

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Fashion, Film & TV, Weekly Words

Weekly Words: 2nd September 2017

“Reflecting on a Decade of ‘Gossip Girl’ With Eric Daman” – Fashionista

It’s hard to believe that it has been a decade since Gossip Girl hit the small screens and had an impact on a generation of kids. We all wanted to live that Upper East Side lifestyle filled with scandal and, most importantly, style. I know some people whose real life was like a watered down version of that strangely enough. In honor of the anniversary, Fashionista.com conducted an interview with Eric Daman, the costume designer behind all of the looks on the show. He was responsible for all of the characters’ sartorial choices and almost single-handedly put headbands back on the map. It’s a great, nostalgic read really (linked above).

“Shopify’s E-commerce Empire Is Growing in Amazon’s Shadow” – Bloomberg

I was interested to read this article about Shopify and how it helps small business owners grow purely because it is the platform that I am most familiar with having used it at my internship. In fashion, there are three to four basic hosting sites that every brand uses for their e-commerce ventures. Shopify is growing to be a major player thanks to its super user-friendly interface. It is literally so easy to use that it is incredible. Because of its ease of use and relatively low cost, it is a good option for people who want to create small businesses and sell merchandise online in their own branded store, instead of through a platform like eBay or Etsy. You’d be surprised by how many huge businesses use Shopify. If I were to ever start my own e-commerce site, it would be an option I’d definitely lean towards. The article tells the story of a college student who made $100,000 in a year selling Christmas sweaters before moving into custom printed t-shirts. Pretty impressive numbers, right?

“Farfetch Boss José Neves: ‘The Magic of Bricks-and-Mortar Shops Will Never Die'” – The Telegraph

I’ve spoken about Farfetch on here before, in the post about the Vogue Italia e-commerce cover, and how I think it is a great e-commerce site because of its clever model. José Neves, the CEO, gives more of an insight into how the business operates in this interview, calling it a cross between OpenTable & Deliveroo – they can show you what merchandise is available from various boutiques (the same way OpenTable shows you free tables in restaurants) and deliver it to your house (just like Deliveroo does with your food). It was a good analogy really. Neves also talks about how Natalie Massenet joining the site gave it a little more clout as Massenet, the founder of Net-a-Porter, is one of the most credible businesswomen in fashion.

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Fashion, Shows

Fashion Flashback: Dolce & Gabbana SS11

This Dolce & Gabbana is around about the time of my favorite Dolce & Gabbana. In fact, it used to be my favorite brand. I was obsessed with the pretty dresses with the florals. They were so womanly. For a young teenager, the Dolce & Gabbana woman was exactly what I thought I wanted to be when I grew up. She seemed like such a woman. Sophisticated, glamorous, beautiful, motherly – simply everything. She didn’t seem like a kid in any way. She seemed like a grown up who wore heels and had their life together. At that time, I couldn’t even imagine myself in that position nor did I really know how an adult functioned. Since becoming an adult myself, I realize that most of us don’t fit into this tightly edited resemblance of a woman nor is it as desirable to me anymore. Regardless, they did a good job of conveying this through their advertising too – the Italian Dream.

I think Dolce & Gabbana have been overshadowed in recent years by poor press. Social media mishaps, plus some real media faux-pas too (the IVF comments for one) have detracted from the brand and it’s glamorous image. Frequently dressing and speaking out in support of Melania Trump also hasn’t helped them in the fashion industry which tends to skew liberal in its politics. Politics and personal opinions aside, this SS11 collection is gorgeous and full of wedding-worthy dresses that I can definitely appreciate. The beauty looks are, well, beautiful, and I love the hoop earrings.

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Fashion

(Belated) Weekly Words: 26th August 2017

“What to Watch: Twin Peaks: Two Yves Saint Laurent Museums Will Open in the Fall” – WWD

Are Paris or Marrakesh high up on your to-visit list? Now they should be. Pierre Bergé is opening an Yves Saint Laurent museum in each of the aforementioned cities, featuring a permanent collection of the designer’s work spanning decades. Both are set to open in October. I have actually been to two different exhibitions of Yves Saint Laurent’s work. One was at the Museum at FIT. It was an exhibition comparing Yves Saint Laurent and Halston as the two were oft-compared for their similar aesthetics (mainly with people saying that Halston was the American Saint Laurent). The second was focused solely on the designer and it was at the Bowes Museum in England. I had to drive a long way to get to the museum but it was so worth it. Hopefully one day I’ll get to make the journey back to Paris and (for the first time) to Marrakesh to visit the permanent collections. Yves Saint Laurent has been my favourite designer for almost my entire life so a museum of this standard is prolific to me.

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Fashion, Opinion

Clear-Outs

I’ve spent a lot of time this summer watching Keeping Up With the Kardashians. I don’t know why but for some reason I got the urge to start on the very first episode and work my way through. I’ve made it to season 8 where Kim is pregnant with little North. Because I’ve dedicated so many hours of my life to watching the family and their transition from typical Hollywood princesses with little true class and/or knowledge of actual runway fashion to fashion industry fixtures, I’ve been paying more attention to Kim in the episodes and her style. What she wears chronicles her place in the world. As soon as she met Kanye West, she became a real star in the fashion sense. Out with the old, tacky outfits and in came Kanye’s high fashion makeover. That’s not to say all of the looks work for her, but it is an improvement on her old style, even though it doesn’t seem entirely true to her character. Of course, 2013 Kim Kardashian is a very different person than the 2017 edition – stylistically and characteristically. What struck me the hardest was when, in one season 7 episode, Kanye brought in his stylist Renelou Padora  to clean out Kim’s closet. They were ruthless, going through all of Kim’s possessions and leaving her with very little (according to the show anyway). Rows of shoes lined up her hallways and piles and piles of clothes were donated to charity. In comes Kanye with racks of designer clothing in various shades of neutrals. This marks the new era for Kim. Of course, it wouldn’t be KUWTK without a little drama so Khloe comes round and gets upset by what Kim is getting rid of, taking it as an insult to her style as she has so many similar items too. Looking back at this episode in 2017, it’s funny because all of the sisters dress so differently now and have definitely had the Kanye West makeover. Kim’s submissiveness throughout the closet ravaging was strange to me. She allowed herself to be completely changed by Kanye. She was like his little Barbie doll to play dress-up with, a new project. In losing her typical mid-2000s Hollywood style, she lost a bit of herself.

Clearing out your closet doesn’t have to herald a change of identity for a person though. I find myself scouring through my belongings on a trimonthly basis. During my clear-outs I tend to get rid of anything that I haven’t worn for a while or that doesn’t fit me any longer. I think doing the process continuously and gradually means you won’t wake up one morning and start with a whole new wardrobe. You can introduce new styles without it seeming so dramatic and you can phase out things you no longer like without feeling like you are changing yourself.

I’ve had a couple of clear-outs over the past few months for various reasons. Firstly, I am moving so I am trying to make it that I have as little stuff as possible to take with me. I wear very similar things on a daily basis anyway so there is no point in me hanging onto items that I haven’t worn once since landing in the United States. The new rule is if it hasn’t been worn since coming here, it isn’t staying. I think that is pretty fair. I don’t think my style has changed too much in the past year besides the fact that I wear black skinny jeans on a near daily basis in the winter – something that I didn’t do before. I also don’t wear long skirts as frequently nowadays. I used to work in a corporate-style office where pencil skirts were the norm. Now that I’m working in a fashion office the dress code is nowhere near as strict and I fortunately can dress in a way that feels more true to me. Besides work, I’m a college student which means I have had to force myself to dress more casual. Whilst you will never catch me in leggings or sweatpants outside of the house, mini-skirts and slip dresses are back in my regular rotation.

I have started to think of inventive ways to get rid of my things. I have listed a few items on Depop – @evegardiner – but have ended up doing more buying than selling. I have donated some stuff to Goodwill. I have sold things at Buffalo Exchange (although not a lot because their buyers tend to be kind of rude) and Beacon’s Closet (which is my favorite because their staff are great and they give you fair prices for your items). Finally, I sent a bag to Thred-Up. Basically, with Thred-Up they send you a huge postage paid bag for you to fill with clothes and you mail it back to them. Anything that they can sell, they will list on their website and you will get a percentage of the sale price. Anything that is not in sellable condition will be recycled for you. It makes clearing out so easy and gives you the chance to earn a little cash on top of it all. The only downside to this service is the processing time. I sent my items back in mid-July and received an email saying that they wouldn’t get to going through my bag until August 8th. I waited until August 28th before I got any word from them and the payout was rather tiny, but I’m  I’m just happy that my unwanted items aren’t in my apartment anymore. I’d say that Thred-Up is a great service because it is totally hassle free, but if you want to make cash quickly I’d gravitate towards Beacon’s Closet or a similar store where you can get money same-day.

As I have been clearing out, I’ve found myself adding more things to my closet too. I have been a sucker for a good sale recently and have topped up my wardrobe with some summer pieces. This is my first real summer in the city and I didn’t realize how underprepared I was for the heat. I quickly realized that my regular summer attire wouldn’t cut it in 30 degree celsius temperatures. Going forward into the Fall season, I already have a rough idea of a few pieces I’d like to pick up. I want a new black overcoat, quite a masculine style perhaps with some military inspired trims. I’d also like some flat black leather boots with lots of buckles. Topshop already have a great pair but they’re eye-wateringly expensive in USD. Finally, I’m looking for a really cool hat. I can see a great look already so I’m trying to figure out how to execute it. It’s likely that I have until at least October until the temperatures drop low enough to try it out. In the meantime, I’m going to enjoy the summer heat and the newfound style it has afforded me.

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Essays

Instagram and Nudity

How much nudity is too much?

With Instagram, I feel like I have been totally desensitized to nudity yet in recent weeks I have found myself noticing it more and more. It wasn’t something that used to bother me really. I always thought that I don’t have to participate in posting photos like that if I don’t want to, so why should I care? But I have found myself caring and I’m not sure why. I don’t need to be bothered by other people’s photos but for some reason I am.

Take Elsa Hosk as an example – a beautiful model who makes a living posing in her lingerie for Victoria’s Secret. Her work shots are fine. They are selling the underwear. She is doing her job. But her Instagram tells another story. It is full of full nude shots and super sexualized selfies, and every time I look at it I am trying to work out why she posts these things? What is her motivation? She is already one of the most well-known models in America, idolized by girls and wanted by guys, yet she seems to be trying to get more attention online, grow her following, and do it by posting her naked body. I find it a little sad that women’s bodies are still their strongest form of currency. I know that we are supposed to have reached a new wave of feminism where posting your body online under your own terms and reclaiming it back is what women are all about now, but I also can’t help but think that by posting yourself naked and doing so for your own gain (financial or followers) is just playing into the hands of men around the world who continue to think of women as little more than their body.

I have noticed this nude trend trickle all the way down from the real famous (Kardashians & Jenners) to the insta-famous (all of those “models” with 50k+) to regular girls that you and I know in real life. It’s just strange and borderline worrying because I hope that it doesn’t put girls in a position where they feel that posting their body online for likes is the best way to boost their self esteem. Your body should never be more important than your mind. I don’t really care if people want to post themselves naked or with very little clothes as long as there is no ulterior motive behind the post, but if the reason that you’re posting it is for likes (which you use, in turn, to measure your self worth) then there is an issue in my opinion. This is a complex issue which, if handled the wrong way, can veer into slut shaming. I’m all about body positivity and feeling good about yourself, but I’m also all about having a life off of the internet and not using social media for personal gain, whether that be amassing a large amount of followers or using your likes to gain a confidence boost. I don’t intend to single out Elsa Hosk in a negative way in this piece. She is a beautiful woman who seems super sweet, has cool style, and appears to be a nice person with lots of friends and a great relationship. Her Instagram is really pretty which is why I initially followed her. I just got a little bit turned-off when I felt like her posts were just full of nudity in an over-the-top way. And hey, I guess if you’re a VS model you are being paid for your body looking great. At least it sells the lingerie. I just feel conflicted and a little bit confused on this matter and I struggle to articulate my thoughts on it properly.

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